5 Brazilian Portuguese Phrases to Learn for the World Cup

5 Brazilian Portuguese Phrases to Learn for the World CupThe FIFA World Cup is one of the largest and most anticipated sporting events in the world. With many of the matches kicking off, you might be hearing more and more Portuguese. This year’s World Cup has placed Brazil in the spotlight, including for its language. Brazilian Portuguese comes with its own set of rules and understandings, especially when in the case of football or soccer. Whether you are in Brazil for the World Cup or just want to feel transported right onto the field, here are five Brazilian Portuguese phrases to learn for this year’s World Cup.

Hora da onça beber áqua:
The literal translation of this Brazilian Portuguese football phrase, hora da onça beber aqua, means the time that the jaguar drinks the water. If you hear this phrase, most likely the Brazilian is referring to the time when the match is about to begin. In essence, it refers to the moment of truth when fans will find out what kind of game it’s going to be.

Craque: While not a phrase, craque is one important word to know in Brazilian Portuguese when it comes to football. The term refers to the star soccer player. This is usually the most well known player on the team or the best player. The word comes for the English word crack, a term used to define the best soldiers. In Brazil, it evolved to be used in the football sense as craque described the true thoroughbred horses.

Um pomba sem asas: During the World Cup, you are bound to see a pomba sem asas, or in other words, a pigeon without wings. While you might not see these beings in the literal sense, Brazilian Portuguese uses this phrase to describe the ball when a player kicks it very hard and toward the goal, often when the player is quite far away.

Onde a coruga dorme: In the literal sense, this Brazilian Portuguese phrase means, “where the owl sleeps.” Where the owl sleeps on the football field in Brazil often refers to the top corners of the goal post. You might hear this phrase when a player places the ball in the goal in these corners. This phrase can vary. It can also be stated, “Acertou onde a coruga dorme,” meaning hit the spot where the owl sleeps.

Gooooooool or Golaço:
This Brazilian Portuguese football phrase might be the easiest to point out while watching the World Cup. When you hear, “Goooooooool,” a goal has just been made. The extra Os are usually used when Brazil has scored the goal. You might also hear someone say golaço, meaning a great or fantastic goal. This term is used when the goal was particularly difficult, challenging or impressive.

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