Cheers! How to Toast in 10 Languages

Cheers! How to Toast in 10 LanguagesWhen most people travel, they at least try to take in the local color, including when it comes to imbibing in local beverages. As you clink glasses in new lands, you will want to know how to properly toast in each language. Raise your glass and utter these ways of saying cheers in 10 different languages.

German: When Germans toast, they look one another in the eye and say, “Prost.” Prost is used usually only when drinking beer. If you are toasting with wine you can say, “Zum wohl.” Also, it is considered bad form to take a swig before everyone has their beer.

Japanese:
In order to cheers in Japanese with your sake in hand, you will want to know the word Kanpei. The word means empty cup or bottoms up and can be pronounced by saying "gahn-pie."

Portuguese: For most people who speak Portuguese, you can say cheers with a simple, “Saúde!” To get the pronunciation right, you sound out saw-OO-de.

Greek: As you throw back the ouzo in Greece, you will need to toast first saying, “Yamas!” Some Greeks with also say yasas, which also means hello.

Chinese: If you are toasting in Chinese, things can get a little tricky. You can say Gānbēi if you want everyone to down their drinks. If you just want to toast in a more civilized manner, you can say, “Wàn shòu wú jiāng.”

Spanish: Much like the other Latin based languages, Spanish speakers toast by saying some form of “to your health.” A Spanish toast can be most simply uttered by saying, “Salud.”

Czech: Czechs do enjoy imbibing so if you visit the Czech Republic, you will want to know how to toast properly. To say cheers in Czech or literally to good health, you say, “Na Zdraví.”

Italian: When you make a toast in Italy, you can simply say, “Salute!” Conveniently enough, you can also use this term after someone sneezes, meaning, “Bless you.”

French: To say cheers in French, you will hear, “Santé.” The word translates as health. The French also toast by saying, “Tchin tchin.”

Gaelic: While you can get by in Ireland without speaking a lick of Gaelic, you will want to know how to toast in the language. Use Sláinte to say, “To good health,” while toasting with a dark Guinness.

 

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